She Is Perfection


She is perfection. 

A real life sleeping beauty. From the curve of her mouth to the wisps of hair lying across her cheeks. Her smooth skin unblemished by the hardships of the world. 
Sometimes I try to view the world through her eyes. Remarkable and immense. There is so much she doesn’t know. And yet she astonishes me with her ability to grasp the nuances of human interaction. The way her voice can suddenly shift and take on the cadence of someone much older than her two years. Where did she learn that? Is she imitating me? Someone else? Or is this something she has come to all on her own and much too quickly. 

She is perfection. 

Her short hair in ponytails. Wearing two kinds of mismatched polka dots. I pretty, Mommy. Yes. Yes, you are sweetheart. You are the most beautiful girl. And I hope she always know that. But someday she won’t and she won’t believe me when I remind her. Never mind. I don’t want to think about that now. I just want to watch the way my girl dances whenever she hears music. Spinning in circles. Arms flailing. So pleased with herself because when she jumps, both feet come up off the ground. 

She is perfection. 

Toddling down the long hallway of a hotel, the pink tutu of her bathing suit swaying back and forth with her clumsy gait. She is running as fast as her small, chubby legs will carry her. She is trying to catch up with her older brother and even though that’s impossible. Even though she will never be as fast as him, she shrieks with delight. And I just want to freeze time. Freeze the moment so that I can always go back and visit this child of mine. This girl who is ready to take on the world. 

She is perfection. 

Moana: An Authentic Role Model for Our Daughters

Did you know that some people are very angry about Disney’s new movie, Moana?

They are arguing that the main character, Moana, is a bad example for young girls because she is more “realistically bodied” than previous Disney princesses. Instead of an exploding bust and itty-bitty waist, Moana looks more like a regular girl.

In one article, Moana was called obese and said to promote bad eating habits. A woman wrote this. A woman. If she looks at Moana’s flat chest and slender hips and thinks “obese”, I don’t even want to know what that woman considers skinny. All the girl does is eat bananas, coconuts, and fish while she’s swinging around on a tiny boat and battling evil monsters!

But seriously, words matter. And when we judge woman, even animated women, by their bodies, our children are listening.

Moana is healthy. She is athletic. And she is strong.

I was raised watching movies of featuring princesses who’s ultimate goal was to find true love. That’s it. Find true love and…the end. Moana isn’t looking for love. She’s trying to save her people. In an age when children’s toys and media are becoming increasingly sexualized and unrealistic, it’s refreshing that Disney is bucking the trend. Moana joins company with other strong female characters like Mulan and Elsa. And that is something to celebrate.

I’m not raising my daughter to be a princess and finding true love is most certainly not going to be the end of her story. She might grow up to be a doctor, a teacher, a wife, a mother, or who knows what. I’m focusing on raising a person that is brave, strong, confident, and kind. Finally our daughters have role models that portray these characteristics.

So instead of bashing these princesses not being skinny enough or being too headstrong, we should hold them up and raise our daughters up along with them.